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Dec 6 2017
by Impact News

Just Say No To Crystalline Silica

Crystalline silica sounds like a cross between a supplement and a new age gemstone — which is partly accurate, since silica is commonly known as quartz, and is the principal component of sandstone and other rocks. But unlike the naturally occurring geological formation, crystalline silica is not so benign.

Tiny airborne particles of quartz dust are able to penetrate deep into the lungs, which can cause silicosis (an incurable lung disease), lung cancer, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), and kidney disease.

Dangerous Dust Everywhere

This is especially worrisome for those who work in industrial occupations, in activities such as sandblasting; sawing brick; drilling into concrete walls; grinding mortar; manufacturing brick, concrete, stone, or ceramic products; and cutting or crushing stone.

Increasingly, however, airborne silica is becoming a risk for the general population via commercial products such as cosmetics, pet litter, talcum powder, caulk, and paint. Is it safe to even go to work, apply make-up, seal that leaky window, or clean up after kitty?

To help protect workers, OSHA (the Occupational Safety and Health Administration) has been enforcing the Respirable Crystalline Silica in Construction standard since September 23, 2017. The standard established a new PEL of 50 µg/m3 for all covered industries, as well as requiring additional employee protections, such as:

  • performing exposure assessments
  • using exposure control methods
  • respiratory protection
  • medical surveillance
  • developing hazard communication information
  • keeping silica-related records.

Alternatives to Silica

Of course, the best course of action is to use materials free of crystalline silica whenever possible. Which is where XSORB can help.

Impact Absorbents products are created to be non-toxic and environmentally friendly. Our flagship absorbent, XSORB Universal, is an ecological dry formula composed of an inert natural mineral that poses NO risk of crystalline silica during liquid spill clean up. It’s non-leaching and fully encapsulates all liquids, outclassing clay, cat litter and diatomaceous earth (D.E.) by a country mile.

In terms of your cosmetics, we suggest exploring healthy living sites such as Safe Cosmetics and the Organic Consumers Association. Education is the best way to maintain your health. Placing a few crystals on the shelf can’t hurt, either.

 

From → Absorbents, Safety